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2016 May 1Z0-058 Study Guide Questions:

Q71. Which three are components of Oracle HA Framework for protecting third-party applications using Oracle Clusterware? 

A. resources 

B. action programs 

C. voting disks 

D. application VIPS 

E. SCAN VIPS 

Answer: A,B,D 

Explanation: 

Oracle Clusterware HA Components 

untitled 

D60488GC11 Oracle 11g: RAC and Grid Infrastructure Administration Accelerated 5 - 4 


Q72. I he ASM instance in your environment can support databases from version 10.2.0.4 through 11.2.0.1 You want to use all ASM functionality possible for each database, including OCR and voting files In the ASM. What is the proper setting for the ASM diskgroup attribute on diskgroups being used by all the instances? 

A. Set compatible.asm to 11.2 and compatible.rdbms to 10.2 

B. Set compatible.asm to 10.2 and compatible.rdbms to 10.2 

C. Set compatible.asm to 11.2 and compatible.rdbms to 11.2 

D. Set compatible.asm to 10.2 and compatible.rdbms to 11.2 

Answer: A 

Explanation: Disk Group Compatibility Attributes COMPATIBLE.ASM The value for the disk group COMPATIBLE.ASM attribute determines the minimum software version for an Oracle ASM instance that can use the disk group. This setting also affects the format of the data structures for the Oracle ASM metadata on the disk. The format of other file contents is determined by Oracle ASM Dynamic Volume Manager (Oracle ADVM) and the database instance. 

For Oracle ASM in Oracle Database 11g, 10.1 is the default setting for the COMPATIBLE.ASM attribute when using the SQL CREATE DISKGROUP statement, the ASMCMD mkdg command, and Oracle Enterprise Manager Create Disk Group page. When creating a disk group with ASMCA, the default setting is 11.2. 

COMPATIBLE.RDBMS The value for the disk group COMPATIBLE.RDBMS attribute determines the minimum COMPATIBLE database initialization parameter setting for any database instance that is allowed to use the disk group. Before advancing the COMPATIBLE.RDBMS attribute, ensure that the values for the COMPATIBLE initialization parameter for all of the databases that access the disk group are set to at least the value of the new setting for COMPATIBLE.RDBMS. 

For example, if the COMPATIBLE initialization parameters of the databases are set to either 11.1 or 11.2, then COMPATIBLE.RDBMS can be set to any value between 10.1 and 11.1 inclusively. 

Oracle. Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide 

11g Release 2 (11.2) 


Q73. What is the recommended procedure to shut down an ASM instance with a mounted ACFS file system at /u01/app/oracle/acfsmounts/vol1, where the volume name is VOL1 and the disk group name is DATA? 

A. Issue the synchronize command for the file system twice. Then stop the ASM Instance with the SQL*Plus SHUTDOWN ABORT command. 

B. Use the advmutil dismount /all /DATA command. Then stop the ASM instance with the SQL*Plus SHUTDOWN IMMEDIATE command. 

C. Use the /bin/umount /u01/app/oracle/acfsmounts/vol1 command. Then shut down the ASM instance with the SQL*PIus SHUTDOWN IMMEDIATE command. 

D. Use the SQL ALTER DISKGROUP VOLULE VOL1 DISMOUNT command. Then stop the ASM instance with the SQL*Plus SHUTDOWN IMMEDIATE command. 

E. Stop the ASM instance with the SQL*Plus SHUTDOWN IMMEDIATE command. 

Answer: C 

Explanation: 

Oracle ACFS and Dismount or Shutdown Operations It is important to dismount any active file system configured with an Oracle ADVM volume device file before an Oracle ASM instance is shutdown or a disk group is dismounted. After the file systems are dismounted, all open references to Oracle ASM files are removed and associated disk groups can be dismounted or the instance shut down. Oracle. Automatic Storage Management Administrator's Guide 11g Release 2 (11.2) 


1Z0-058  actual exam

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Q74. During the installation of Oracle Grid Infrastructure 11.2, it is possible to incorporate failure isolation support by using Intelligent Platform Management Interface (IPMI). 

Which four statements regarding IPMI configuration are true? 

A. Each cluster member node requires a Baseboard Management Controller (BMC), which runs a firmware compatible with IPMI version 1.5. 

B. The ethernet port on each cluster node used by BMC must be connected to the IPMI management network. 

C. Each node in the cluster must have an IPMI driver installed. 

D. The cluster requires a dedicated network specifically for IPMI. 

E. If you intend to use IPMI, you must provide an administration account username and password when prompted during installation. 

Answer: A,B,C,E 

Explanation: 

2.13.1 Requirements for Enabling IPMI You must have the following hardware and software configured to enable cluster nodes to be managed with IPMI: 

Each cluster member node requires a Baseboard Management Controller (BMC) running firmware compatible with IPMI version 1.5 or greater, which supports IPMI over LANs, and configured for remote control using LAN. 

Each cluster member node requires an IPMI driver installed on each node. 

The cluster requires a management network for IPMI. This can be a shared network, but Oracle recommends that you configure a dedicated network. 

Each cluster member node's Ethernet port used by BMC must be connected to the 

IPMI management network. 

Each cluster member must be connected to the management network. 

Some server platforms put their network interfaces into a power saving mode when they are powered off. In this case, they may operate only at a lower link speed (for example, 100 MB, instead of 1 GB). For these platforms, the network switch port to which the BMC is connected must be able to auto-negotiate down to the lower speed, or IPMI will not function properly. 

Have IPMI Configuration completed and have IPMI administrator account information If you intend to use IPMI, then ensure BMC interfaces are configured, and have an administration account username and password to provide when prompted during installation. For nonstandard installations, if you must change configuration on one or more nodes after installation (for example, if you have different administrator usernames and passwords for BMC interfaces on cluster nodes), then decide if you want to reconfigure the BMC interface, or modify IPMI administrator account information after installation. Oracle. Grid Infrastructure Installation Guide 11g Release 2 (11.2) for Linux 


Q75. You notice that there is a very high percentage of wait time for the gc current split event in your RAC database that has frequent insert operations. 

Which two recommendation would you make to reduce this problem? 

A. shorter transactions 

B. using hash partitioned global indexes 

C. uniform and large extent sizes 

D. automatic segment space management 

E. smaller extent sizes 

F. increasing sequence cache sizes 

Answer: D,F 


Q76. Which two actions in a warehousing RAC database may cause concurrent cross-instance calls leading to I/O contention? 

A. truncate table statements 

B. select statements referring to non-partitioned tables 

C. drop table statements 

D. insert statements where each instance inserts into different partitions of a partitioned table 

Answer: A,C 

Explanation: 

Concurrent Cross-Instance Calls: Considerations In data warehouse and data mart environments, it is not uncommon to see a lot of TRUNCATE operations. These essentially happen on tables containing temporary data. In a RAC environment, truncating tables concurrently from different instances does not scale well, especially if, in conjunction, you are also using direct read operations such as parallel queries. As shown in the slide, a truncate operation requires a cross-instance call to flush dirty blocks of the table that may be spread across instances. This constitutes a point of serialization. So, while the first TRUNCATE command is processing, the second has to wait until the first one completes. There are different types of cross-instance calls. However, all use the same serialization mechanism. For example, the cache flush for a partitioned table with many partitions may add latency to a corresponding parallel query. This is because each cross-instance call is serialized at the cluster level, and one crossinstance call is needed for each partition at the start of the parallel query for direct read purposes. 

D60488GC11 Oracle 11g: RAC and Grid Infrastructure Administration Accelerated 14 – 27 What Application Design considerations should I be aware of when moving to Oracle RAC? The general principals are that fundamentally no different design and coding practices are required for RAC however application flaws in execution or design have a higher impact in RAC. The performance and scalability in RAC will be more sensitive to bad plans or bad schema design. Serializing contention makes applications less scalable. If your customer uses standard SQL and schema tuning, it solves > 80% of performance problems Some of the scaleability pitfalls they should look for are: 

* Serializing contention on a small set of data/index blocks --> monotonically increasing key --> frequent updates of small cached tables --> segment without automatic segment space management (ASSM) or Free List Group (FLG) 

* Full table scans --> Optimization for full scans in 11g can save CPU and latency 

* Frequent invalidation and parsing of cursors --> Requires data dictionary lookups and synchronizations 

* Concurrent DDL ( e.g. truncate/drop ) Look for: 

* Indexes with right-growing characteristics --> Use reverse key indexes --> Eliminate indexes which are not needed 

* Frequent updated and reads of “small” tables --> “small”=fits into a single buffer cache --> Use Sparse blocks ( PCTFREE 99 ) to reduce serialization 

* SQL which scans large amount of data --> Perhaps more efficient when parallelized --> Direct reads do not need to be globally synchronized ( hence less CPU for global cache ) RAC: Frequently Asked Questions [ID 220970.1] 


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Q77. Which three statements are true about the management of Oracle Services? 

A. To manage workloads or a group of applications, you can define services for a particular application or a subset of an application's operations. 

B. Similar work can be categorized under services to ease workload management. 

C. Users who share a service should have different service-level requirements. 

D. Oracle Enterprise Manager or SRVCTL should be used to control cluster-managed services, not DBMS_SERVICE. 

Answer: A,B,D 

Explanation: Using Oracle Services 

To manage workloads or a group of applications, you can define services that you assign to a particular application or to a subset of an application's operations. You can also group work by type under services. For example, online users can use one service, while batch processing can use another and reporting can use yet another service to connect to the database. Oracle recommends that all users who share a service have the same service level requirements. You can define specific characteristics for services and each service can represent a separate unit of work. There are many options that you can take advantage of when using services. Although you do not have to implement these options, using them helps optimize application performance. 

Oracle does not recommend using the DBMS_SERVICE package for use with services used by an Oracle RAC database. Use SRVCTL or Oracle Enterprise Manager to create database services for Oracle RAC. 

Oracle Real Application Clusters Administration and Deployment Guide 


Q78. You are managing a three-Instance RAC database. In the AWR report, you notice a gc current block busy wait event on one of the database Instances, in the cluster top timed events section. 

What are two possible reasons for this wait event? 

A. Access to blocks was delayed as the blocks were pinned In exclusive mode for updates by some sessions. 

B. Access to blocks was delayed by log writes on remote Instance. 

C. Frequently used select statements are causing high disk Input/output contention. 

D. CPU shortages. 

Answer: A,B 

Explanation: 

Analyzing Performance Using GCS and GES Statistics The gc current block busy wait event indicates that the access to cached data blocks was delayed because they were busy either in the remote or the local cache. This could be caused by any of the following: 

The blocks were pinned The blocks were held up by sessions The blocks were delayed by a log write on a remote instance 

A session on the same instance was already accessing a block which was in transition between instances and the current session needed to wait behind it (for example, gc current block busy) Contention-Related Wait Events The main wait events for contention-related waits are: 

gc current block busy gc cr block busy gc buffer busy acquire/release 

The contention-related wait event statistics indicate that a block was received which was pinned by a session on another node, was deferred because a change had not yet been flushed to disk or because of high concurrency, and therefore could not be shipped immediately. A buffer may also be busy locally when a session has already initiated a cache fusion operation and is waiting for its completion when another session on the same node is trying to read or modify the same data. High service times for blocks exchanged in the global cache may exacerbate the contention, which can be caused by frequent concurrent read and write accesses to the same data. The gc current block busy and gc cr block busy wait events indicate that the local instance that is making the request did not immediately receive a current or consistent read block. The term busy in these events' names indicates that the sending of the block was delayed on a remote instance. For example, a block cannot be shipped immediately if Oracle Database has not yet written the redo for the block's changes to a log file. 

Oracle. Real Application Clusters Administration and Deployment Guide 11g Release 2 (11.2) 


Q79. Which three statements are true about Oracle Clusterware component log files? 

A. Oracle RAC uses a common unified log directory structure to store all Oracle Clusterware component log files. 

B. The consolidated directory structure simplifies diagnostic information collection and assists during data retrieval and problem analysis. 

C. The Clusterware and Database log files are stored under the same unified directory structure. 

D. The location of the log directory structure is <Grid_Home>/log/<hostname>. 

E. The log directory structure is the same on UNIX and Linux systems, but different on Windows platforms. 

Answer: A,B,D 

Explanation: 

Oracle Clusterware Main Log Files 

Oracle Clusterware uses a unified log directory structure to consolidate the Oracle 

Clusterware component log files. This consolidated structure simplifies diagnostic information collection and assists during data retrieval and problem analysis. 

The slide shows you the main directories used by Oracle Clusterware to store its log files: 

CRS logs are in <Grid_Home>/log/<hostname>/crsd/. The crsd.log file is archived every 10 

MB (crsd.l01, crsd.l02, ...). 

CSS logs are in Grid_HOME /log/<hostname>/cssd/. The cssd.log file is archived every 20 

MB (cssd.l01, cssd.l02, ...). 

EVM logs are in <Grid_Home>/log/<hostname>/evmd. 

SRVM (srvctl) and OCR (ocrdump, ocrconfig, ocrcheck) logs are in 

<Grid_Home>/log/<hostname>/client/ and $ORACLE_HOME/log/<hostname>/client/. 

Important Oracle Clusterware alerts can be found in alert<nodename>.log in the 

<Grid_Home>/log/<hostname> directory. 

D60488GC11 

Oracle 11g: RAC and Grid Infrastructure Administration Accelerated 2 - 11 


Q80. The original cluster on RACNODE1, RACNODE 2, RACNODE 3, and RACNODE4 had the Oracle Grid Infrastructure installed to support Grid Naming Service (GNS). 

What should be done to verify that the two new nodes called RACNODE5, RACNODE6 are physically connected? 

A. cluvfy stage -post crsinst -n RACNODE5,RACNODE6 -verbose 

B. cluvfy stage -post nodeadd -n RACNODE5,RACNODE6 -verbose 

C. cluvfy stage -post hacfg -verbose 

D. cluvfy stage -post nodeadd -n all –verbose 

Answer: B 

Explanation: 

Completing OUI Silent Node Addition Perform integrity checks on the cluster. [grid@host01]$ cluvfy stage –post nodeadd –n host03 -verbose D60488GC11 Oracle 11g: RAC and Grid Infrastructure Administration Accelerated 4 - 8